Quince Bonsai

How to Maintain the Quince Bonsai

 

 

 

The species names of Chaenomeles is a taxonomist’s nightmare. Usually, they are referred to as japonica although I see species used often for the larger varieties. A similar situation exists for crabapples where the parent species are so cross bred that they are named simply Malus followed by the cultivar name. I have adopted this same procedure and will leave the fight to the taxonomists. Although I must add that C. contort does seem to be a distinct species, or, at least, subspecies since the contorted characteristics are preserved in the seedlings.

Quince Bonsai
Quince Bonsai

One of the best forms for bonsai is ‘Hime’ a small red form with solid red flowers and showy yellow stamens. The flowers and fruit are smaller than other Quince making it a good choice. The growth is not aggressive and it gets quite twiggy at an early age. This is the darkest red form I have ever seen. However, the growth is weak and upright, but the sheer beauty of the flowers make it good candidate. The most beautiful white form is undoubted ‘Jet Trail’, an almost prostrate and slightly contorted form. The flowers are a brilliant pure white without a trace of pink, and it is very floriferous and a repeat bloomer.

As for how to maintain the Quince Bonsai

1 Like others have said healing is slow – think carefully about large pruning cuts. It’s slow to bulk up.

2 Like most fruiting varieties they like a little heavier mix and lots of water. My Quince is usually one of the first to show it’s dry – by new shoots sagging slightly. It loves lots of feed – I feed mine every 10 -14 days.

3 Wire young shoots early to get movement

4 Root pruning is tolerated well and they can take quite a substantial root reduction.I repot mine in early Spring. I add a little-chopped bark to my usual totally inorganic mix.

5 Quince can flower on and off for 6 months of the year here in the UK (which is quite an achievement). They are always the first to flower and seem impervious to frost. Leaving on one or two fruits is OK but if you want to build structure I’d remove them. One year in three I disbud totally and let it rest.

6 A healthy quince will occasionally pop new buds on the trunk use these to improve your branch structure.

Quince Bonsai

The species names of Chaenomeles is a taxonomist’s nightmare. Usually, they are referred to as japonica although I see species used often for the larger varieties. A similar situation exists for crabapples where the parent species are so cross bred that they are named simply Malus followed by the cultivar name. I have adopted this same procedure and will leave the fight to the taxonomists. Although I must add that C. contort does seem to be a distinct species or, at least, subspecies since the contorted characteristics are preserved in the seedlings.

One of the best forms for bonsai is ‘Hime’ a small red form with solid red flowers and showy yellow stamens. The flowers and fruit are smaller than other Quince making it a good choice. The growth is not aggressive and it gets quite twiggy at an early age. This is the darkest red form I have ever seen. However, the growth is weak and upright, but the sheer beauty of the flowers make it the good candidate. The most beautiful white form is undoubted ‘Jet Trail’, an almost prostrate and slightly contorted form. The flowers are a brilliant pure white without a trace of pink, and it is very floriferous and a repeat bloomer.

As for how to maintain the Quince Bonsai

1 Like others have said healing is slow – think carefully about large pruning cuts. It’s slow to bulk up.

2 Like most fruiting varieties they like a little heavier mix and lots of water. My Quince is usually one of the first to show it’s dry – by new shoots sagging slightly. It loves lots of feed – I feed mine every 10 -14 days.

3 Wire young shoots early to get movement

4 Root pruning is tolerated well and they can take quite a substantial root reduction.I repot mine in early Spring. I add a little-chopped bark to my usual totally inorganic mix.

5 Quince can flower on and off for 6 months of the year here in the UK (which is quite an achievement). They are always the first to flower and seem impervious to frost. Leaving on one or two fruits is OK but if you want to build structure I’d remove them. One year in three I disbud totally and let it rest.

6 A healthy quince will occasionally pop new buds on the trunk use these to improve your branch structure.