BONSAI OAK

History of bonsai Oak Tree

An oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus Latin “oak tree” of the beech family, Fagaceae. There are approximately 600 extant species of oaks. The common name “oak” may also appear in the names of species in related genera, notably Lithocarpus. The genus is native to the Northern Hemisphere, and includes deciduous and evergreen species extending from cool temperate to tropical latitudes in the Americas, Asia, Europe, and North Africa. North America contains the largest number of oak species, with approximately 90 occurring in the United States. Mexico has 160 species, of which 109 are endemic. The second greatest center of oak diversity is China, which contains approximately 100 species. (wikipedia)

BONSAI OAK
BONSAI OAK

The Oak tree grows freely in colder areas of the Northern Hemisphere such as England, Scotland, parts of the USA and many others. A fully grown Oak can surpass well over 100 feet in height, and will have a very thick trunk.

Japanese immigrants brought the art of bonsai to California in the early 20th century, but it was not widely practiced until after World War II. Oak is not traditionally used for bonsai in Japan, but its use began in California in the 1950s.

The White Oak, also English, is also a desired tree for the purposes of Bonsai, but are a little harder to train. However, their foliage and colours more than make up for it!

BONSAI OAK
BONSAI OAK

The large trunks and small leaves of the oak create attractive miniatures of old, full-grown trees. The cork oak (Quercus suber) is popular for bonsai. However, the thick branches are easily fractured, and the tree is sensitive to root pruning. The easiest native oak to begin with on the West Coast is the coast live oak (Quercus agrifolia)

The Oak is a particularly hardy tree and is able to withstand climatic extremes, from drought to sun exposure. This makes the Bonsai Oak tree a particularly great candidate for your care.